Food and Nourishment

As we prepared to leave Totem, snug in a berth in San Carlos, and return to the states for the summer- a concerted effort was made to work through our food stores. Thus it was, scrounging in the depths of a locker not long ago, that I discovered a jar of Julie and Gloria’s homemade jam. A hidden gem, so unexpected – I thought these had been used up months ago. But there, winking up from the depths of a food storage locker, was the unmistakable quilted glass canning jar with “2008 – Raspberry”, labeled in Julie’s hand.

I can’t deny getting a little misty. Granted, I tend to obsess over food, so this discovery may have moved me more than the average person, but this little jar was a link to people I love and places I hold dear. It brought back a flood of memories, from blackberry picking on Eliza island with my cousins Claire and Bryn, to cooking cherries, blackberries and blueberries down to jam with my Heidi in Bellingham, to receiving the gift of this particular jar (and several of its brethren) last fall. It is pure goodness: raspberries, cooked down and sealed to store for months until it can be opened for a delicious off-season treat… or in our case, a treat impossible to reproduce or recreate in our tropical environment. It was rays of sun in a Ball jar.

Foraging in Baja bears no resemblance to the foraging I loved doing in the Northwest. I am tempted to try and recreate a few things from home, though. Perhaps I’ll try making prickly pear jam once we can collect the fruit. It will be fun, and possibly delicious, but it can’t evoke the feelings of the blackberry. One thing I know for sure, the canning cobwebs need to be dusted off before we cross to the south pacific next year: what we’ve heard about the prices of food! Hopefully I can expand my repertoire to canning meats, too.

Food preservation has been useful in Mexico for the shorter term, too. In April, at a La Paz grocery store we saw basil for the first time in months. I couldn’t let that by, and purchased everything I found (about five generous bunches). It was chopped, covered in olive oil, and kept in the refrigerator- and Voila! Two months of pasta and pesto, basil – bean salads, and other treats.
BASIL!

For the next two months, the crew of Totem is spending time in the US. We’re visiting friends and family, although we’ll miss out on our land based home in the Northwest. There are only so many miles of country you can traverse in a rental car… especially a Mercury Grand Marquis with 3 children in the back (let’s just say that our family is not the target market for this vehicle). I will be looking for sour cherries that need canning, directions to MI sources gratefully accepted.

7 Responses to Food and Nourishment

  1. s/v Seven C's July 6, 2009 at 10:15 am #

    SPOT shows that you made it to your destination just fine! I hope it was a good trip (albeit long).
    Sometimes finding small things can be a real treasure.
    Mama found a jar of Albacore that she had canned that was still in our locker last week. She was pretty excited about that since we thought that we had finished it all also:)

  2. First Mate PJ Baker July 7, 2009 at 3:51 am #

    I’ve got the pressure cooker canning book and another good one about holistic preserving. We can learn together. PJ

  3. moliver July 7, 2009 at 12:24 pm #

    i gotta know – are you missing tortillas and jam yet?

  4. Zaneta July 9, 2009 at 11:30 pm #

    Hi,
    I am enjoying your blog. My husband and I are thinking of sailing away also. What advise would you have for us? We have an eight year old son. My e-mail is fizzbee29@cox.net
    Thanks so much!
    Zee

  5. Overboard July 22, 2009 at 11:28 pm #

    That basil looks good. When I cruised in the Eastern Med on the rally we found a tonne of sundried tomatoes and popped them in olive oil, too. Did the same with some cheese. When I finally get back to the boat, I want to do lots of pickling etc. The only bummer is that Mexico, or at least up in SC/Guaymas, is pretty lame when it comes to yummy provisions.
    poormooft

  6. Sammi September 6, 2009 at 2:01 am #

    New to your post…love it! If you ever have basil again, blend it up with sundried tomatoes and garlic and a little olive oil if the tomatoes didn’t have enought. add in some pasta water if its too ‘chunky’. Toss around with pasta…yumm!

    Can you grow basil on the boat? In AZ we ‘root’ the basil stems in water for a week or so and then stick it in a pot…many basil plants grow great like this.

  7. Heidi December 7, 2009 at 1:02 pm #

    Behan! This is Claire (writing from mom’s computer) and my mother, Julie, Glenna, Jo, dad, and I have all been sitting around after dinner as I read your blog aloud to the group–it’s been so nice to feel caught up on the goings on of your life! We’re reminiscing about your cooking– scones, killer pumpkin pie, etc. Mom was just reminding us that you burned her pomegranate syrup though 🙂 Everyone is wondering whether there is a mailing address to which we can send you Christmas provisions including more jam! Or perhaps I will just have to carry it to you in person? Eh? So much love to all of you! Oh and we have been reading Niall’s blog too, it’s so great. We miss you guys a lot! xoxoxoxo

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